#INWED18 – Ask An Engineer: Anna-Lynn Sandfield

Anna-Lynn has worked as an Engineer in the Automotive sector since 2015 when she graduated from Oregon State University with a degree in Mechanical Engineering & Material Science, and joined DSD in January 2018.

International Women in Engineering Day (INWED – 23 June annually) focuses attention on the amazing careers in engineering and technical roles for young women, and allows us to celebrate the achievements of our outstanding women engineers. (source: http://www.inwed.org.uk)

We took the opportunity to interview DSD Inc. Transmission Engineer Anna-Lynn Sandfield to find out what motivated her to start a career in engineering and her highlights working in the industry. We hope this might offer some inspiration to young people, especially young women in their final years of school, to consider the opportunities a career in engineering offers.


1. What does your role as a Transmission Engineer at DSD involve?

My job title is Transmission Engineer, however, I do a lot more than just design work and spreadsheets. I coordinate with people to make sure projects are on time, helpful to the customer, and valuable to both our customer and to DSD. In short, I solve problems for people whether they be logistical, communication, or technical.

2. What led you to choose a career in engineering?

Both my parents were engineers (now retired) and my older sister (who I worshipped as only a little sibling can) is currently a quality engineer in the aerospace industry. Growing up, being involved with Robotics and Kinetic Sculpture Racing gave me the opportunity to see what engineering was actually about and gave me hands on experiences which helped me know what I was getting into after college

3. What is the best part about working in engineering? 

Working with a team to help make the world a better place! I do a lot of work on electric vehicles and improving combustion vehicles. Plus, I’ve kinda always liked gears.

4. What is the best part about working at DSD? 

The people! Also the culture of integrity – I know I’m never going to have to do something I feel is wrong.

5. Can you offer any tips or advice for young people considering a career in engineering? 

My advice is to not forget the human aspects of engineering. Engineers work as teams. Learn from your team projects in school because it will be valuable later. Yes, sometimes you will be the person who wants to help on a project but just don’t have time to contribute more than quality assurance. Learn how to still add value. Sometimes, you will be the person who does most of the work. Learn how to be organized and transparent so others can still contribute. Also remember to joke and have fun with your projects! Life happens while you work. Form friendships with the people you spend half your life with!